Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Refined

While in college, I worked in a department store.  One of my co-workers was an attractive young lady and we began to develop a bit of a friendship. Late night phone calls, movies together, dinner with friends, and shared memories all allowed this friendship to continue for over a year.  While I was happy to be her “friend,” I didn’t want our friendship to turn into the “friendship trap.”  My heart wanted more. After a year, I began to talk to her about how I was really feeling and my desire for more than just friendship.  She was reluctant.  I was patient.  Finally, my charm and chiseled good looks won her over and we became “official.”  I thought great things were lying ahead for us ... until our first Valentine’s Day four months later.  Since this was going to be our first Valentine’s Day together, I wanted to go big.  I purchased some special gifts, ordered some roses, and then had it all delivered to her house so it would be waiting for her when she got home from work. I could not wait to hear from her about how good of a boyfriend I was.

That night, I received a phone call from her that went something like this:  “Happy Valentine’s Day, Rich.  Thanks so much for the gifts.  That was really nice.  By the way … I don’t think we should date any more.”  She broke up with me … over the phone … on VALENTINE’S DAY!  It felt like someone had sucked all of the air out of the world as well as all of the sunshine.  Ugh! 

What does that have to do with Christmas?  Well, I think that’s about as close as I can come to feeling what Joseph must have felt when Mary told him that she was expecting.  They were engaged to be married and had saved themselves for each other … or so Joseph thought.  The next thing you know, Mary is telling him some story about an angel, the Holy Spirit, and a prophecy that says “and the virgin will conceive,” and she just happened to be the virgin.   Put yourself in Joseph’s place.  I’m sure it was all a bit much for Joseph to believe and I can only imagine the hurt and betrayal he must have initially felt.  Yet we are told that “Joseph, being a just man and unwilling to put her to shame, resolved to divorce her quietly.”  (Matthew 1:19)

How does one respond in that way?  To be shamed and yet still be unwilling to put Mary to shame says a lot about who Joseph was as a man.  Some say that troubles build character.  While that’s not untrue, I’m not sure it’s completely true.  While troubles do help build character, they reveal character as well and, in this case, we discover that Joseph was a “just man.” This type of character is not forged overnight.  No doubt, God had been refining Joseph’s character for a long time.   

What my very own “Valentine’s Day Massacre” revealed was that my character was anything but “just.” I was hurt.  I was angry. And, I, unfortunately, was more than happy to put her to shame. I would say very unkind things about her behind her back and THINK even more unkind things about her in the silence of my own mind.

Her actions against me never justified my actions against her, though.  If anything, what her actions did was reveal the true condition of my heart. The cruel words I would say about her, and the even more cruel thoughts I would think about her, all revealed what had been lying dormant in my heart.  Her treatment of me was simply the opportunity those things needed to rise to the surface.  

We can think of our hearts like a snow globe.  If someone had never seen a snow globe before, they would not know that there is all of this flaky white stuff lying dormant on the bottom of the globe.  But, once the globe gets shaken, it’s then that we see all of the flakes start to swirl around. It’s the same with our hearts.  We often do not know what is lying underneath until life begins to shake us a bit.  If and when that happens, we often begin to see the ugliness of sin lying underneath the surface.  When we do, I think it’s important to remember that the Holy Spirit reveals those things not to condemn us, but rather to refine us. Circumstances, people, events, longings unfulfilled, desires unmet … they’re all often used to bring to the surface what God longs to transform because making us holy is God’s unwavering agenda for His children.      

We all need to be refined.  Proverbs 17:3 reminds us that: “The crucible is for silver, and the furnace is for gold, and the LORD tests hearts.”  Because we know that God is with us and for us, we can also know that the “fires” of life are meant to refine us and not consume us.  As God continues His work in us, we can be confident that “the testing of your faith produces perseverance.  Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything. (James 1:3 - 4 NIV) 

If Joseph was anything like us, I’m pretty confident that the first time … probably even the second, third, and fourth time he faced a “fire” in his life, he didn’t respond the way he did in Matthew 1:19.  Being refined into the image of Christ is a process and we’re all at different points in that process.  And, as we allow the Holy Spirit to do His work, we’ll discover that “We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they help us develop endurance.   And endurance develops strength of character, and character strengthens our confident hope of salvation.   And this hope will not lead to disappointment. For we know how dearly God loves us, because he has given us the Holy Spirit to fill our hearts with his love.” (Romans 5:3 – 5 NLT)

We know that "he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ." (Philippians 1:6 ESV)​ One day we will be refined perfectly.  One day we will all be able to say, “At last I am completely free of sin!”  One day our lives will fully reflect the final and completed work of God and we know that “when he appears we shall be like Him, because we shall see Him as He is.”  (1 John 3:2)  For now, though, we are being refined and we can trust that God is working inside of us. As one person has said:  “God will take you where you haven't intended to go in order to produce in you what you could not achieve on your own.”  As we walk with God, we can trust that He is before us, that He is behind us, and that He is with us.  He will make sure we are heading in the right direction as long as we keep our eyes on Him.  

Verses to Consider:  2 Corinthians 6:3 – 10, James 1:2 – 4, 2 Peter 1:5 – 9  

Do Not Be Afraid

“Do not be afraid.”

There have been a few times in my life when I felt genuinely afraid.  Once was in elementary school.  Before my fists became the lethal weapons they are today, a school bully threatened me.  I had never been in a fight before and I had no desire to learn what it felt like to be punched in the face.  That confrontation with the bully brought some fear in to my young life.

Another time was in 2011 when I jumped off a 20-foot platform into 50-degree water during a Tough Mudder race.  For some, this is no big deal.  For me it was huge! I had just learned how to swim three months before this. Well, to say it more accurately, I had learned how not to drown three months before this.  It’s hard to call what I do in the water “swimming.”  Needless to say, after spending my life in the shallow end, this jump in to deep waters was scary for me. 

Another time was in 2007 when I was diagnosed with cancer.  I wasn’t so much afraid of dying, but I was afraid of not being there for my wife who just happened to be 8 months pregnant with our first-born son when I was diagnosed.  What if I didn’t make it?  I’d be leaving her and our son all alone.  I was afraid.

In my own experience with fear, I often find that facing the unknown is what often produces the most fear in my life.  An “unknown” is always followed by a “what if.”  What if this happens and my life ends up in shambles?  What if I do this and I fail? What if I’m left all alone?  What if I let someone down?  What if others think poorly of me?  What if my family suffers?  What if I do not have control over the situation?  What if I can’t do it? What if?  What if?  What if?

Is there a “what if” in your life today? 

As we move in to the Christmas season, it’s important to remember that on four separate occasions in the Christmas story, the words “Do not be afraid” were spoken:  To Joseph in Matthew 1:20, to Zechariah in Luke 1:13, to Mary in Luke 1:30, and to the shepherds in Luke 2:10.  God instructed His messengers to say these four words, but not in the sense of telling them not to feel fear.  I believe those four words were spoken with the intent of saying: “Do not let the fear you feel keep you from doing what I’m calling you to do.” 

Fear is an emotion we often seek to avoid.  Fear exposes our weaknesses.  Fear exposes our neediness.  Fear can often bring out the worst in us. Because of these things, the temptation is to avoid fear by seeking out safety, comfort, and security.  Our prayers can then begin to sound like this: “God, if you could just help me and my kids not to be hurt by anything or anyone, that’d be great.  Keep us safe … maybe put us in a gated community with guard dogs or better yet, guardian angels!  Just let life be OK.”  The problem is that we can soon find ourselves reaching for safety and comfort more than we are reaching for God.

If Mary had trusted her fear more than she trusted her God, she never would have been used by God to deliver our Savior in to the world.  If Joseph had trusted his fear more than he trusted his God, he never would have seen the miracle of the virgin birth, the joy in the eyes of the shepherds, or the admiration of the magi. If the shepherds had trusted their fear more than they trusted their God, they never would have seen the Incarnation “wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger” with their very own eyes.

Fear, like any emotion, can actually be something God uses to draw us in to a deeper trust relationship with Him.  Throughout the pages of Scripture, God’s message to those who feel afraid is: “I am with you.”  Today His answer is still the same … “Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall call his name Immanuel” (which means, God with us).  

Are you afraid today?  Is there a “what if” making itself out to be larger and more powerful than the “I am with you” presence of God? If so, instead of running from them, take an honest look at your fears and your “what if’s” and bring them before God.  This is the pattern we see in the Psalms.  This is the pattern of Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane.  If we do anything less than this, we are actually missing an opportunity to take a step toward our Savior … a step that will draw us in to a deeper trust relationship with Him and help us discover that in every situation, “God is with us.” 


Verses to Consider:  Joshua 1:9, 2 Samuel 22:30 – 33, Psalm 46:10 – 11, Jeremiah 32:17, Romans 8:31 - 39

Monday, October 30, 2017

Viva la Reformacion!

In 1505, a 21-year-old Martin Luther was walking in the midst of a tremendous thunderstorm when a bolt of lightning struck the ground near him. The average  bolt  of  lightning, contains roughly one billion joules of  energy. This is enough to  power a 60-watt light bulb for six months!  In Martin Luther’s case, it contained enough energy to scare him in to becoming a monk.  Shortly after the lightning bolt incident, he sold all of his possessions and entered the monastery. 

While at the monastery, he came to be known as an incredibly “successful” monk.  That meant he immersed himself in prayer and fasting and all of the disciplines of the monastic life.  He once commented that “If anyone could have earned their way to heaven by the life of a monk, it was I.” Yet, he found himself continually discouraged and no amount of discipline or tradition was found to help.

At the age of 27, after a visit to Rome, he became very disheartened by the corruption he saw in the church and among many of the priests.  He began to study Scripture in search of the answers and the hope he was looking for and between the years 1512 – 1518, he went through a series of intellectual revelations, especially after studying the book of Romans.

On October 31, we will celebrate the 500th anniversary of when Martin Luther infamously nailed his 95 Theses on the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church and the Reformation was born.  The basic tenants of the Reformation are: Scripture Alone, Faith Alone, Grace Alone, Christ Alone, To the Glory of God Alone.  The tenants of the Reformation have had a major impact on me personally.  Here’s why:

Scripture Alone – When reading the Bible, I discover that God, ,through Jesus, is restoring everything that sin has ruined The Bible alone is God’s word to mankind.  In it I find the very words of God.  With those words I am taught what is true, shown was is wrong, corrected when I stray, taught to do what is right, equipped for every good work, comforted in every struggle, and given the opportunity to know the God of the Universe.  I’m no longer chained to tradition or bound by the words of those in “religious authority.”  I can open up God’s word, study it for myself (or better yet, in community with other followers of Jesus), and then trust the Holy Spirit to soften my heart, open my eyes, and empower me to obey.

Faith Alone – This is not faith in my faith.  Depending on the day, my faith can be weak or strong.  If I place my faith in my faith, then I’m setting myself up for a very unbalanced life.  My faith is not in my faith.  My faith is in God who “does not change like the shifting shadows” (James 1:17).  My cry of faith is to Him alone for salvation.  I do not trust in the size of my faith or the strength of my faith because even my faith can then become an idol.   What you boast in is what gives you confidence to face the day.  I do not want to boast in my faith.  I want to boast in the object of my faith. “As for me, may I never boast about anything except the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ." (Galatians 6:14)

Grace Alone – Without grace I find myself seeking to earn something from God.  So as long as I’m “doing, doing, doing” … God is happy with me.  But, if I’m “don’ting, don’ting, don’ting” … God is out to get me.  What an exhausting way to live.  Grace frees me from all of that.  God’s grace says that even my best “doing” would never be enough to earn His favor and it also says that my worst “don’ting” is never enough to lose His favor.  “Grace never calls wrong, right.  Grace is a way of dealing with the wrong.” (Tripp) “For by grace you have been saved through faith.  And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast.” (Ephesians 2:8 – 9)

Christ Alone – “Jesus lived the perfect life of obedience so we could be saved from striving to live that life on our own.  God declares us to be righteous, not because of any work we have done, but because of the work Jesus did. (Romans 5:1)  We can rest from working to measure up to perfection.  We can ceases striving to be perfect by our own strength and efforts.  We can rest in the life of Jesus lived on our behalf (Matthew 11:29, Romans 5:8 – 9) … Jesus died in our place to save us from the wrath of God and the penalty of sin, which is spiritual, relational, and physical death (Romans 6:23) He saves us from spiritual death and makes us alive in Christ (Ephesians 2:4 – 5) He atones for our guilt and removes our shame (Romans 8:1 – 3).  He reconciles us to God so that we can also be reconciled to one another (2 Corinthians 5:18).  And ultimately, though our bodies will fail and die, he will give us glorified resurrection bodies that will live forever … We are new!  We are alive!  We are free!  We are no longer slaves to sin, but are now slaves to righteousness – slaves to what is truly living!”  (Vanderstelt)

To the Glory of God Alone – As much as I’m tempted to make it so, my life is not about me.  I am not the center of the Universe.  And, even my salvation is not about me.  It’s about God!  He put something of Himself on display through saving me … His holiness, His love, His justice, His grace, His compassion, His mercy, His righteousness.  The salvation I have received is more about the One who gave it rather than the one who received it.  If and when I begin to lose sight of this, I forget that I am saved only by grace alone … not because I was voted most likely to become a Christian.  If I forget that my salvation is more about God than it is about me, I am in danger of becoming less in awe of God and more in awe of me. “For everything comes from Him and exists by His power and is intended for His glory.  All glory to Him forever!  Amen.” (Romans 11:36) The only reason that I can look in the mirror and say to myself that “I am saved” is because God is kind and I am loved by Him. 


Scripture Alone, Faith Alone, Grace Alone, Christ Alone, To the Glory of God Alone … may God continue to use these truths to remind us of His goodness.  “I will praise the Lord, and may everyone on earth bless His holy name forever and ever.”  (Psalm 145:21)

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Passing the Baton

It’s really hard to believe that it’s been a year since our church transitioned leadership from Pastor Mark, who had served as lead pastor for 26 years, to Pastor Mitchel, who had been serving at Grace for 4 years.  The image that was often used to describe the transition was the passing of a baton.  I can’t imagine any better way to describe what the past year has been like.  The reality is, every one of us in ministry is in a relay race.  At some point we will all pass the ministry baton we’re running with to someone else.  Whether we serve somewhere for 2 years, 12 years, or 26 years, every one of us in ministry is running a relay.  If you think of it in terms of track and field, a relay race is an event in which athletes run a pre-set distance carrying a baton before passing it onto the next runner.  At some point in our ministry race we will hand the baton off to the next person.  If we do not remember this, we’ll run a relay race like an individual race.  All sorts of problems will arise if that happens:  We’ll hold on to the baton when we should let go of it … we’ll focus on our own race instead of trying to set the next person up for success … we’ll make ourselves the point of the race instead of remembering that this is a team effort … we’ll just drop the baton when we’re finished running … we’ll forget that someone else actually handed us the baton that we are holding now.  

Our role in ministry (volunteer or vocational) is never an individual race.  It is always a relay and we only have a “pre-set distance” to run before passing off the baton God has placed in our hands.  The sooner we realize this, the more successful we will be when it’s our time to pass the baton.  Here are a few things I’ve observed and processed over the past year since the baton was passed at Grace and a few things I’ve experienced in my own baton passing.

1.    The baton pass is important.  In any relay race, it’s imperative for a good hand off to take place.  If there is a mistake while passing the baton, the team is hindered or disqualified.  In ministry, if the baton pass goes bad, the “team” may not be disqualified, but it is certainly hindered.  For that reason, great care and prayer needs to go in to the process of handing off the baton:  When will this happen?  Who will make the final decision?  Will this be an internal or external hire?  What needs to be a part of the timeline?  The best relay teams practice passing the baton over and over.  For a successful baton pass in ministry to take place, doing the hard work up front and having a strategic plan in place may not make things easy, but it will certainly make them easier.

2.    The baton pass is important but the hard work is running the race itself.  The one passing the baton knows this.  The one receiving the baton will find it out, if they do not know it already.  In a relay, the runner doesn’t get fatigued passing the baton.  The fatigue begins to set in as they take step after step after step in the race. 

3.    Run at your own pace.  Each runner in a relay runs a pre-set distance.  The difference in ministry is that we do not know exactly what that distance will be.  But, whatever the distance, we must run it at a sustainable pace.  In an actual race, if I’m trying to run with people who are just way faster than me, I’ll burn out too quickly and not run to my potential.  If I’m running with the people who are slower than me, I’ll never allow myself to be stretched and pushed physically, and I’ll not run to my potential.  God strategically places us somewhere in order to fulfill His purposes (Acts 13:36, 17:26). All we can do is run our race to the best of our ability and trust Him for the results. We are simply called to run the race and to make the most of the abilities God has given us.

4.    A runner never runs a perfect race because there are no perfect runners.  When the baton is passed, every condition of the organization (the good and the bad) is passed on with it.  The hope is that more good than bad is passed on, but since no runner is perfect this side of heaven, we can expect to receive both.  To expect any different would be denying the reality of the human condition.

5.    People are watching.  Some of them are cheering for you and are more than happy to encourage you along the way.  Some of them do not like how you’re running the race and seem eager to criticize the way you do so.  The weight of all those eyes can feel very heavy unless we remember that the most important set of eyes watching are always for us … “The eyes of the LORD search the whole earth in order to strengthen those whose hearts are fully committed to him.” (2 Chronicles 16:9)  We must remember who we are in His eyes and find our strength in the presence, the power, and the promises of God.

6.    Stay in your lane.  The lane marks clear boundaries for a runner.  If a runner steps out of his/her lane, the team is disqualified.  A good organization will have a vision, values, and mission based upon God’s word.  We need to stay within those boundaries to keep us focused in any transition and to help us move forward in the most effective way.

7.    Keep your eyes fixed on Jesus.  “Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider Him who endured such opposition from sinners, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart.” (Hebrews 12:1 – 3) 

Passing the baton in ministry is difficult work and full of surprises and no matter how much you prepare for it, there will always be some unexpected twists and turns organizationally but also personally.  There are always matters of the heart that God brings to the surface that maybe we didn’t realize were there before we passed the baton or received it.  All of that, though, is an act of grace by God who brings all of it to our attention so He can continue His work of transforming us into the image of Jesus. 

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Reflections on Charlottesville

It’s been a few days since the tragic atrocities in Charlottesville.  I’ve been pondering these events and just wanted to share a few thoughts.  I’m not sure they’ll be in any particular order.  I’m just typing them as they come.

  •      For any one person or group of people to place their race, origin, color, nationality, or status above another’s is completely out of line with the character of Christ.  This is something that even the Apostle Peter needed to have his eyes opened too:  “I see now realize how true it is that God does not show favoritism.”  (Acts 10:34)
  •      Lament the fight before fighting the fight.  Most of us are better at being angry than we are at being sad. In fact, many of us are so unwilling to face sadness that we will often use anger to mask it:  “I’m not sure I know how to be sad, but I sure know how to be angry.  Let’s do this!”  We’re far too willing to be angry over sin in our world but less willing to lament over it.  As followers of Jesus, we must lament the sin in our world.  We must cry over the injustice and the hurt and the pain. In our hearts we hunger for the perfect peace of heaven but we are force-fed a daily diet of this war zone called earth.  We must ask the question that David asked in Psalm 35:17 “How long, oh Lord?”  Romans 8:21 reminds us that all  “creation looks forward to the day when it will join God’s children in glorious freedom from death and decay.”    Cry out with the rest of creation at the pain and the brokenness and the impact of sin all around us.  “Even so, come quickly, Lord Jesus.”  (Revelation 22:20)
  •      We need to feel sad before we feel angry, but that doesn’t mean we cannot feel angry.  I believe we can use anger as a motivation for good.  While it’s not wise to waste your energy getting all upset about the everyday little frustrations of life, it is wise to be angry over the stuff that really matters.  If you hear a racial slur, if you see a man or woman being devalued if things like that stir up anger inside of you, I say let it stir.  If those types of things burden you, then you need to feel the weight of that burden because when a burden for something different becomes greater than our willingness to live with the status quo, that’s usually when we take action. 
  •       In Nehemiah chapter 2 we read that Nehemiah is burdened to rebuild the protective wall around Jerusalem.  As he examines the wall, he finds that it is in worse shape than he ever imagined!  And, not only is the wall in bad shape, but people are coming to him and saying, “If you start to rebuild this wall, there is going to be trouble.  We are going to come after you ... we are going to hurt you!”  But, none of this scares him away.  There’s actually a time later in the book of Nehemiah when he says, “Should a man like me run away I will not go!”  (Nehemiah 6:11) Fear typically stands between us doing and not doing.  The best of us will be rendered useless if fear has its way.  Courage requires that we not run away but rather run toward the problems.  And, the truth of the Gospel empowers us to do so.
  •     Even if you do not know what to do, at least acknowledging what has happened can feel supportive to someone.  I’m obviously white.  I don’t think my friends of color are expecting me to have all the answers, but I think they can rightly expect me to at least acknowledge that when something like Charlottesville happens, something is drastically wrong. 
  •      The Gospel gives us a clear calling to move toward the hated and the haters.  Jesus said, “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you He causes the sun to rise on the evil and the good.”  (Matthew 5:44-45).  The Apostle Peter tells us to “Respect everyone.”  (1 Peter 2:17) The Apostle Paul reminds us that “God demonstrated His own love for us in this: while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.”  (Romans 5:8)

These are just some random, late night reflections.  I certainly do not have all the answers, but I do want to help be part of the solution.  That starts in my heart … allowing it to be broken … allowing God to help me see what He sees … trusting that He will enable me to stand beside those being mistreated and empower us all to take steps together toward healing.  

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Would you give up a possible $2 million dollars?

This past weekend I spoke on the importance of investing our time in to our most important relationships.  If you're interested, you can watch the video right here.  
After I spoke, someone from our church sent me this article which I thought was such a great encouragement about focusing on our most important relationships.  It's well worth taking 3 minutes to read it.
One Dad's $2 Million Sacrifice for His Daughter
Would you give up a potential $2 million payday to see your daughter graduate from high school?
Professional golfer Phil Mickelson is doing just that.
Because the opening round of the U.S. Open falls on the same day as his oldest daughter’s high school graduation, Phil has announced plans to withdraw from this year’s event.
It’s not the first time Mickelson has chosen family over work.
Back in 1999, Mickelson was competing at the U.S. Open in North Carolina just as his wife, Amy, stayed in their home back in Arizona. She was pregnant at the time – and the baby was due any day.
Mickelson went ahead and competed – but his caddie had a beeper in his pocket. And if Amy alerted him she had gone into labor, Phil would leave North Carolina and head home, even if he was leading the tournament.
Turns out Mickelson didn’t have to leave the U.S. Open that year, because his daughter, Amanda – the same daughter who is graduating this month, was born the day after the U.S Open finished.
Mickelson’s act of devoted love might even be at the expense of his lifelong dream. That’s because the U.S. Open is the only major tournament that the father of three hasn’t won. He’s come in second place six times.
“Phil desperately, desperately wants to win the U.S. Open,” said his wife, Amy, during an interview.
Yet the window of opportunity for Mickelson to win a career Grand Slam is closing. Mickelson is getting older – he’ll be turning 47 on the day of his daughter’s graduation – and the oldest golfer to have won the U.S. Open was 45.
But while Mickelson is convinced he would have a good shot at winning this year’s Open, he’s keeping his family his top priority.
“It really wasn’t much of a decision,” Mickelson explained. “As you look back on life, there are certain things you need to be there for.”
There’s little doubt Amanda is a healthier, better adjusted person for her father’s sense of commitment and sacrifice.
I’ve long talked about the importance of fathers on this blog, on the Focus on the Family Daily Broadcast, and in my book, “The Good Dad.”
Research continues to bear out this truth.
Just this week the Wall St. Journal reported on a study that used an ingenious research design to help prove that insufficient fathering predisposes girls to risky sexual behavior, defined as promiscuity, unprotected sex and sex while intoxicated.
The findings were definitive, explains Dr. Danielle DelPriore, one of the researchers.
“The prolonged presence of a warm and engaged father can buffer girls against early, high-risk sex,” she said. “It’s all about dosage of exposure to dads; the bigger the dose, the more fathering matters—for better and for worse.”
It’s just one way involved fathers can make a very real, very positive difference in their children’s lives.
I’ll be rooting for Phil Mickelson as he continues to compete in future tournaments and hope he gets his U.S. Open championship next year at Shinnecock Hills on Long Island.
But if you ask me, he’s already won the best prize.
by Jim Daly

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